Canadian Journal of Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology

Generalization of /s/ from English to French as a result of phonological remediation

 
Author(s) James C McNutt, PhD
Volume 18
Number 2
Year 1994
Page(s) 109-114
Language English
Category
Keywords bilingual
generalization
speech
/s/
production
Abstract French and English speaking children have been observed who have problems with /s/ production in both languages. The purpose of this investigation was to determine if therapy presented in English and directed towards the /s/ production problem in English, would generalize and result in similar changes for /s/ in French. In this investigation all seven children who received a motor based therapy program for /s/, generalized /s/ from English into French on a variety of levels. These findings may be taken to indicate the strength of generalization for certain procedures directed toward remediation of /s/. Information from this investigation is useful in determining services for children with phonology disorders and examining the effect of linguistic differences upon generalization between languages.

On a observé des enfants qui parlent le frainçais et l'anglais, et qui ont de la difficulté à prononcer le /s/ dans les dwux langues, pour déterminer si une thérapie prodifuée en anglais en vue de corriger le probléme de prononciation dans cette langue se généraliserait et entraînerait une amélioration comparable en français. Les sept enfants qui ont suivi un programme thérapeutique de type moteur pour le /s/ ont généralisation pour certaines méthodes orthopédagogiques visant à corriger la prononciation du /s/. La présente étude fournit des données utiles pour déterminer les services à offrir aux enfants atteints de troubles phonologiques et examiner l'effet des différences linguistiques sur la généralisation d'une langue à l'autre.
Record ID 262
Link http://cjslpa.ca/files/1994_JSLPA_Vol_18/No_02_78-144/McNutt_JSLPA_1994.pdf
 
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