Canadian Journal of Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology

The Impact of Early Onset Otitis Media on Prelinguistic Speech Development

 
Author(s) Susan Rvachew, PhD
Elzbieta B Slawinski, PhD
Megan Williams, MSc
Carol L Green, MSc
Volume 20
Number 4
Year 1996
Page(s) 247-255
Language English
Category
Keywords otitis
media
babble
speech
infant
Abstract Numerous studies have shown that otitis media (OM) during infancy has a negative impact on language development later in life. Few studies have examined the effect of OM on prelinguistic behaviour during infancy. The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of OM on the development of canonical babble in children who experienced at least one episode during the period of birth through six months of age, in comparison with children who did not experience OM during this period. The results show a consistently lower rate of canonical babble among children with early onset OM, when compared to children with later onset OM, during the period six through 12 months of age.


D'innombrables études ont démontré que l'otite moyenne (OM) chez le nourrisson a une incidence négative sur le développement du langage plus tard au cours de la vie. Peu d'études ont porté sur l'effet de l'OM sur le comportement prélinguistique à l'âge du nourrisson. Cette étude visait à faire enquête sur l'incidence de l'OM sur le développement du babillage canonique chez les enfants ayant eu au moins une episode avant l'âge de six mois, par comparasion avec les enfants qui n'ont pas fait d'OM au cours de cette période. Les résultats témoignent d'un taux constamment moins élevé de babillage canonique chez les enfants atteints d'OM d'origine précoce, par comparaison avec les enfants chez qui l'OM survient plus tard, pendant le période de six à 12 mois.
Record ID 164
Link http://cjslpa.ca/files/1996_JSLPA_Vol_20/No_04_218-282/Rvachew_Slawinski_Williams_JSLPA_1996.pdf
 
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